Saturday, 18 January 2014

12 year old missing since January 5 found safe, admits to running away after parents’ scolding

12 year old missing since January 5 found safe, admits to running away after parents’ scolding



12 year old missing since January 5 found safe, admits to running away after parents’ scolding
Police found a 12-year old girl, Mirai Atarashi Friday morning, who has been reported missing since January 5. She was discovered in a car park of a restaurant in Higashi-Sumiyoshi Ward in Osaka, after a woman recognized her from pictures released by local police.
It was reported that Atarashi went  on January 5 and was last seen at the Yada train station. She was said to have met five of her friends through the instant messaging on the day she disappeared. Her mother recalled getting a text message from her daughter at around 2:30 p.m., saying that she was on her way home after visiting a leisure park in Sakai with her five friends. Atarashi and a friend parted ways at the Yada station around 6:15 pm and she was not seen after that. Her parents reported the incident to the police two days after.


The woman who found Atarashi saw the pictures released by the police a day after her parents reported her missing and compared it to the girl she had seen in the car park of a restaurant. She called the police around 11:20 a.m. on Friday and they came in to find Atarashi safe but exhausted. When asked for the reason she ran away, the girl said that her parents scolded her and so decided to leave. Police have now taken her into protective custody and no further details on the last 12 days that she was missing were given out.

Japanese soldier who hid in Philippine jungle for 30 years after WWII dies at age 91


Japanese soldier who hid in Philippine jungle for 30 years after WWII dies at age 91
He was one of the last “hold outs” of World War II and gained popularity for hiding out until 1974 in the jungles of the Philippines. But now, Hiroo Onada’s story has finally come to an end as he passed away on Friday in Tokyo at the age of 91.
Onoda was an information officer and guerilla tactics coach when he was sent to Lubang in the island of Luzon in the Philippines in 1944 at the height of the Japanese occupation of the Southeast Asian country. Part of their training and instructions was to never surrender, commit suicide or relinquish their duty until reinforcements arrived. He and three other soldiers took this command to heart (and maybe too literally?) even after the United States liberated the Philippine islands in 1945. The Japanese Imperial Army was defeated, signalling the end of World War II, but these four soldiers refused to leave their posts in the jungle. Years after the end of the war, they continued to survey the area and even attack the local residents occasionally and get into skirmishes with the Philippine military.
Their story became widely known after one of them emerged from the jungle and went back to Japan. Another soldier died sometime in the 1950s. Both the Philippine and Japanese governments searched for the remaining two, but in 1959 they were both assumed dead. But in 1972, they got involved in a shootout with local officers, and the other soldier died in the encounter. Japan then brought over Onoda’s family members to convince him that the war was over, but he still believed that these were the tactics of a “puppet regime” installed by the U.S. It wasn’t until 1974 when his commanding officer himself flew in and visited him in his hideout to rescind the previous order that Onoda finally ended his personal war and went home to Tokyo


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