Saturday, 18 January 2014

Slik, snow covered roads tie up I-70



Slick, snow covered roads tie up I-70
An overturned truck sits in the median after a fatal accident Thursday near mile marker 102 on Interstate 70. A second car just west of the truck (unseen) was totally destroyed. (Lisa Perry / C-T photo)
An overturned truck sits in the median after a fatal accident Thursday near mile marker 102 on Interstate 70. A second car just west of the truck (unseen) was totally destroyed. (Lisa Perry / C-T photo)
By SARA GEER and BILL HYDENSnowy conditions and slick roads contributed to several vehicle slideoffs and crashes on I-70 Thursday.

Multiple crashes prompted authorities to shut down I-70 westbound about four miles east of the Knightstown exit, due to an overturned semi crash with injuries.

The driver of the semi, Andelic Novica of Chicago, lost control of the rig due to the slick conditions. The vehicle flipped and blocked both lanes of traffic. Rescue teams from several agencies worked to free Novica, who was trapped between the semi and a guardrail. An ambulance took Novica to Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis with severe leg injuries.

The driver of a Davis Towing and Recovery truck also sustained serious injuries while providing assistance to another vehicle that drifted off the interstate. The driver, whose unidentity was not known at press time, became trapped between the guiderails while towing a vehicle. Sgt. James Goodwin of the Henry County Sheriff's Department was unable to provide any updates on the tow truck driver's status at midafternoon Thursday.

Indiana State Police issued an advisory at 10:30 a.m. asking motorists to avoid the area. Traffic was being detoured off the interstate at the New Castle exit onto Ind. 3, south to U.S. 40 and at the Knightstown exit onto Ind. 109, south to U.S. 40. The eastbound lanes of interstate were closed for a short period of time due to several crashes but reopened Thursday afternoon.

Goodwin, who was out assisting on I-70, said the roads were very hazardous and several crashes could be seen east of Knightstown.

Courier-Times Staff Writer Lisa Perry, driving eastbound on I-70, said the scene on the interstate was unlike anything she had ever seen.

"There were semi wrecks after semi wrecks on I-70," Perry said. "Cars slid off on the medians. It was scary. I told everyone to avoid I-70 all together."

Henry County Emergency Management Office said no traffic advisory had been issued for Henry County.

Joe Wiley, Henry County Highway Department administrator, said crews were sent out to apply extra salt on county roads, especially on curves and intersections. New Castle Street Department reported its crews were doing the same on city streets.

"There is definitely a travel advisory to be considered," Wiley said. "We may have got a small amount of snow, but the drifting has been a problem. Not experiencing the same as on the interstate in regard to crashes since the speed limit is lower."

Mark Dahmer, of the National Weather Service in Indianapolis, said Henry County accumulated 2 inches of snow Thursday. On Saturday, 2-3 inches more of snow is expected in the afternoon into the evening, he said.

"It's just about taking it slow on the roads," Dahmer said. "It's a weaker snow, but you still have to take precautions."

Sara Geer and Bill Hyden are staff writers for The Courier-Times.
Landreths celebrate golden wedding anniversary
Cheryl and Dewayne ... now
Cheryl and Dewayne ... now

 

HAGERSTOWN - Ernest Dewayne and Cheryl Landreth of Hagerstown are celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary on Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014.

They were married on Jan. 18, 1964 at First Baptist Church in New Castle by the late Rev. R.E. Pavy.

She is employed by Roynon Electrical Products Co. (Repco) in New Castle. He is a retired electrician with Dana Corp. in Hagerstown and a farmer in Liberty Township.

Their memberships include hers as a member of Chicago Corner Church and they both now attend Grand Avenue Baptist Church in New Castle. He is a member of Losantville Masonic Lodge and both are members of the New Castle Eastern Star Chapter.

They are the parents of two daughters: Calinda Massengale of New Castle and Brenda Leddington of Lynn; and two sons: Michael Shane Landreth and Faron Landreth, both of Lynn.

There are nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

The couple is celebrating with a dinner. A family celebration is planned for summer in honor of the couple's 50 years of marriage.

A STITCH IN TIME - AND ON TUESDAYS
St. Anne Quilters gather weekly to quilt, visit and share
Donna Cronk / C-T photoSome of the Tuesday morning St. Anne quilters are, from left, Iris Niflis, founder Helen Fuller, Rosemary Niles and Patty Coleman.
Donna Cronk / C-T photo

Some of the Tuesday morning St. Anne quilters are, from left, Iris Niflis, founder Helen Fuller, Rosemary Niles and Patty Coleman.
Donna Cronk / C-T photoPatty Coleman and Helen Fuller have a look at the completed 'Spring Fling' quilt. Tickets will be available starting in April to win chances on it.
Donna Cronk / C-T photo

Patty Coleman and Helen Fuller have a look at the completed 'Spring Fling' quilt. Tickets will be available starting in April to win chances on it.
Donna Cronk
Neighbors EditorIf it's 9 a.m. on a Tuesday, you can bet that a group of ladies will be gathered in a room inside St. Anne Parish Center where they will spend the morning hand-piecing and quilting their latest project. Along with the stitches, they will visit, discuss community events and family, create new projects from their fabric stash and then, once the day's quilting is done, they will go over to the exercise class in the building and participate in that too.

They complete three quilts a year and raffle them. Money raised goes to support St. Anne Catholic Church for one need or another. They've purchased altar linens, albs (robes) for servers, and candelabras, courtesy of their nimble fingers that fashion quilts that have names like Christmas at Your House, Janna's Sunshine, Spring Pansies and Fields and Furrows.

Since the group started in 1989, information about each completed quilt has been neatly recorded and photographed in scrapbooks. They know, for instance, that every time they complete an iris-themed quilt, they sell a lot of tickets.

The quilts are awarded in spring, fall and at Christmas. The Spring Fling quilt, featuring a garden of bright, colorful flowers, will be raffled this spring. It's finished and ready to go.

They are now at work on the fall quilt. They like to work ahead and organization is the name of their game as evidenced in their tidy little stitches on the fabric and the stacks of colorful fabric on their shelves. "This is almost like Jo-Ann Fabric," says Helen Fuller, founder of the group.

Fuller didn't know a thing about quilting in 1989 when a church committee was looking for ideas on getting parishoners involved in activities and fellowships that interested them. She suggested a quilting group. She turned to Gracie Davis, a wonderful quilter, who was on board with the idea and the women started showing up. They've been at it ever since.

"We've had some wonderful quilters along the way," Fuller says.

Some of the other faithful in the fold are current quilters Rosemary Niles, Iris Niflis and Patty Coleman. Others who join them when able are Rosemary Thomas, Jeanette Carlson and Gloria Davis.

Coleman says that behind each quilt is a story. Take the one they are working on now. The fabric in the quilt belonged to Cheryl Worl, who quilted with the women. When she passed away, it was discovered in her will that she left all of her fabric to the St. Anne quilters.

Fuller said the fellowship and ability to be generous in helping the church are what she enjoys most. "We're worker bees," she says. For Coleman, it's the creativity she enjoys most, and she marvels at all of the many talents each of the women who attend have on their own, apart from the quilting.

Fuller describes Niles as the group's professional as she knows how to implement every aspect of quilting. She even taught quilting classes in Florida when wintering there and would have around 40 students. For Niflis, being with the others is her favorite aspect.

Coleman, who joined the quilters after her retirement as a secretary at New Castle Middle School, credits the quilters with teaching her everything she knows about the art. "You just develop a camaraderie. You look forward to being with the ladies."

And if it's 9 a.m. on a Tuesday, they're happy to welcome anyone interested in joining them. Just show up.

Donna Cronk is editor of Neighbors and of her magazine, which will be in Monday's paper.









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